Chemistry: Gay-Lussac’s Law (Gas Laws) with 2 examples | Homework Tutor

For a gas, temperature and pressure are directly proportional. When you keep everything elseconstant, as the temperature of a gas goes up, its pressure goes up. As the temperatureof a gas goes down, its pressure goes down.If you heat up a gas, the gas particles move faster. If the gas is in a solid container,with…

Chemistry: Charles’s Law (Gas Laws) with 2 examples | Homework Tutor

For a gas, temperature and volume are directly proportional. Keeping everything else constant,as the temperature of a gas goes up, its volume goes up. As the temperature of a gas goesdown, its volume goes down.If you heat up a gas, it expands – the gas particles move faster, and they take up morespace. Imagine a…

Chemistry: Balancing Chemical Equations (algebraic method) | Homework Tutor

Our second balancing chemical equations video shows you a different method – an algebraicmethod. Some people love algebra – it has a power to reduce all sorts of hairy problemsto systems of equations with variables – knowns and unknowns, and if that approach appealsto you, you should try this method of balancing chemical equations. Let’s…

How to Use Office Hours | Study Tips | Corson Technique

Hello, my Socratica Friends.We’re here to help you be a GREAT student.Let’s talk about what you do when you don’t know WHAT to do.You’re stuck.You’ve looked at your homework assignment until your eyes are crossed, and you wantto give up.Don’t give up!There’s help out there.But do you know how to use it?In a lot of…

Chemistry: Intro to Stoichiometry with Grilled Cheese Sandwiches | Homework Tutor

Stoichiometry is a kind of calculation in chemistry. It’s sort of like bookkeeping.Stoichiometry lets you figure out how much of a substance is used up or produced in achemical reaction. You need two things to do stoichiometry:1. A balanced chemical equation (balanced is absolutely essential here)and 2. Some measured values (the amount of some of…

Chemistry: Average Atomic Mass (amu, Daltons, etc.) – 2 examples | Homework Tutor

Every element has a characteristic atomic mass, because they each have adifferent number of protons, neutrons, and electrons. Most of the time, you won’t usethe actual masses of each element’s atoms. Subatomic particles are so tiny – theirmasses are so small that it would make problem-solving unwieldy. For instance,the mass of a proton is 1.67…